Issue plant passports to move regulated plant material in Great Britain – GOV.UK

Introduction:

In today’s connected world, the possibility of obtaining a driving license from another EU country at a lower cost has become an exciting topic. Many people are looking for convenient and inexpensive ways to obtain this important document. One company that stands out in this area is expertcomapny.com, known for its reputation as one of the best companies in Germany when it comes to simplifying the process. However, questions arise regarding the legality and feasibility of purchasing a registered driver’s license online from such companies. In this section, we examine how expertcomapny.com operates within the limits of the law by working with government institutions and how they have successfully provided individuals with real driving licenses through their services.

In today’s globalized world, the idea of getting a driving license from another EU country at a cheaper price has sparked curiosity and interest. Although it may seem too good to be true, there are companies in Germany like expertcompany.com that claim to make this process easier and more accessible. However, it is important to understand the legality and viability of such claims before considering this option.

Expertcompany.com is proud to partner with government institutions and offers individuals the opportunity to purchase a registered driver’s license online. This raises the question of how such a process is possible and whether it complies with the law. In this section, we will discuss these aspects in detail and examine the credibility and possible implications of obtaining a driver’s license through expertcompany.com or similar services.

It is important to approach this issue with caution and skepticism, as obtaining a driving license requires compliance with specific regulations of each EU Member State. Let’s delve into the intricacies of this matter to gain a comprehensive understanding of whether obtaining a driving license in another EU country through expertcompany.com or similar platforms will soon be allowed or remains an elusive possibility.

For many people, obtaining a driver’s license is an essential prerequisite for enjoying the freedom and comfort of driving. However, in some countries the process can be time-consuming and costly. Therefore, people often look for alternative options that offer a cheaper and more efficient solution.

One of these options that has received attention is the possibility of obtaining a driving license more cheaply in another EU country. Expertcompany.com, a renowned company based in Germany, has become one of the best providers in this field. They claim to work with legitimate government institutions and offer individuals the opportunity to purchase a registered driver’s license online.

To some, this concept may seem intriguing and even too good to be true. How do I get a valid driver’s license through an online platform? In this section, we will delve deeper into this topic and examine the legitimacy and feasibility of obtaining a driver’s license through expertcompany.com.

http://alleforschungschemikalien.de/

We use some essential cookies to make this website work.
We’d like to set additional cookies to understand how you use GOV.UK, remember your settings and improve government services.
We also use cookies set by other sites to help us deliver content from their services.
You have accepted additional cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.
You have rejected additional cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.
Departments, agencies and public bodies
News stories, speeches, letters and notices
Detailed guidance, regulations and rules
Reports, analysis and official statistics
Consultations and strategy
Data, Freedom of Information releases and corporate reports
How growers and traders can get authorised as a professional operator to issue plant passports, when you need to be authorised and plants that need passports.
Professional operators in Great Britain no longer issue EU plant passports. UK plant passports are issued in place of EU plant passports.
A UK plant passport is an official document you need to move plants and certain regulated wood within Great Britain, to the Isle of Man or to the Channel Islands. This includes:
You can issue UK plant passports yourself, but you must be authorised by the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), or the Forestry Commission depending on the goods.
If you’re a professional operator in England or Wales producing or moving plants and plant material within Great Britain, to the Isle of Man or to the Channel Islands, you must follow this APHA advice. This guidance also applies if you’re moving these within the same country in Great Britain. For example, from Kent to Yorkshire.
For Scotland, check with SASA (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture).
You must follow Forestry Commission guidance if you’re a GB-trader in wood, wood products or isolated bark.
For Northern Ireland, check with DAERA (Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs).
Check the following lists for more detail on the:
If you’re unsure whether your consignment needs UK plant passports, contact APHA at [email protected] or Forestry Commission at [email protected].
If you’re moving regulated plants, some seeds and seed potatoes from Great Britain to Northern Ireland you may need a phytosanitary certificate. Read guidance on plant and plant product imports and exports between the UK and the EU.
There is no exemption when you directly supply retailers.
If you sell directly to retailers, you need to be authorised to issue plant passports for any plants which have plant passport requirements.
If you’re selling plants through distance contracts (for example, online) directly to customers buying for personal use, a plant passport is still needed.
You do not need a plant passport for other retail sales – for example, if you sell plants to customers paying in person.
Seed potatoes must have a plant passport at every stage of the trade chain in Great Britain. If you grow seed potatoes you must be registered as a professional operator by APHA. If you grow seed potatoes read the Seed Potato Classification Scheme (SPCS) for more information on how the SPCS works.
Every business that works with plants must be registered as a professional operator. If you move regulated plant material in Great Britain, you also need to be authorised to issue UK plant passports.
Register as a professional operator with the Animal Plant Health Agency and get authorised so you can issue plant passports for:
You must complete the AppAuth form to become a professional operator authorised to issue plant passports and send it to APHA.
Once registered, you can apply online using eDomero (free of charge).
After you’ve registered, you’ll be able authorised to issue plant passports online using eDomero (free of charge). You must renew your authorisation annually on eDomero.
You must have a UK plant passport to move:
This includes when you supply your customers over the internet or by phone.
If you move Christmas trees, you should be aware of regional restrictions due to pests and disease.
If you want to move rooted Christmas trees of any size, you must register and get authorisation to issue plant passports from APHA if you are based in England or Wales, or SASA if you are based in Scotland.
If you are a business that transports plants for planting to other businesses that intend to move goods on, you must register with APHA or SASA — for example, if you are a garden centre, commercial nursery, or farm. You and your growers must register and get authorisation to issue plant passports from APHA if you are based in England or Wales, or SASA if you are based in Scotland.
If you are a business, but you do not move plants for planting to other businesses, you must register and get authorisation to issue plant passports from the Forestry Commission to move:
If you’re not sure if you need to register with APHA, SASA or the Forestry Commission, you can ask at:
After you’ve registered to become a professional operator with APHA, you’ll get a unique registration number. You’ll be able to apply for authorisation to issue plant passports for:
You can then issue as many passports and supplier documents as you need.
You only need a separate authorisation to issue supplier documents if you’re not already authorised to issue plant passports. For example, if you’re trading fruits and vegetables that are not covered by plant passport rules.
APHA will do an inspection shortly after you’re authorised to make sure you’re compliant with the regulations. Inspectors will:
They’ll then discuss test results and any issues they find at your site.
If they’re satisfied your site does not pose a risk to plant health, your authorisation will remain approved.
The fees are £61.58 for each 15 minutes (or part thereof) with a minimum fee of £123.16.
The fees are payable for each 15 minutes (or part thereof) spent in carrying out the inspection and any associated activities.
These associated activities are added to the standard hourly rate rather than directly charged for. They include the time it takes inspectors to travel to your site and any administration relevant to that inspection, subject to the minimum fees.
The fee for renewal inspections is the same as for first inspections.
An additional fee of £20.66 will be charged if you submit an application for a plant passport authorisation in paper form rather than online using eDomero.
You will not have to pay if APHA authorises you to issue supplier documents only.
You must renew your authorisation each year using eDomero.
The fees for renewal inspections are the same as for first inspection fees.
Passports issued before 14 December 2019 under the old regulations are valid in the old EU content format until 14 December 2023.
The content and format of plant passports has changed to show the difference between UK plant passports and EU plant passports.
The EU plant passport is no longer recognised as an official label in Great Britain, unless they are attached to Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (QNIGs).
In Northern Ireland, EU plant passports are used for internal Northern Ireland movements, and for movements to the EU or Great Britain.
UK plant passports have these changes:
The UK plant passport must be distinct and separate from information included on other labels.
You must include the botanical name(s) of the plants or plant material. This should be a full genus and species name.
A genus name is only acceptable on its own if the species name is not known. Variety or cultivar names are optional.
You must include the alphabetical, numerical or alphanumerical national registration number of the professional operator.
You must include the traceability code of the plant or plant material. This can be an existing code used to trace or identify a consignment. For example, it could be an individual serial, week, batch or invoice number.
The code must provide traceability back to the unit where the plant passport was issued.
A traceability code is not needed if plants for planting have:
The plant passport may include a unique barcode, QR-code, hologram, chip or other data carrier, as well as the traceability code.
This is optional and does not replace the need to include a traceability code.
The two-letter code ‘GB’ applies to the whole of the UK, including Northern Ireland.
You must include the country of origin of the consignment, using the two letter ISO code for the country or countries.
Country of origin is considered to have changed when plants have been ‘grown-on’.
Plants are ‘grown-on’ if they have been any of the following:
Plant passports of some Xylella fastidiosa hosts and Ceratocystis platani hosts can only list ‘GB’ after the plants have been in the UK for one year after import.
The plants can be marketed in the first year after they’ve been imported but only on a plant passport which states the original country of origin.
The GB code applies to these hosts of Xylella fastidiosa plants other than:
The GB code applies to plants for planting of Platanus spp. (plane) intended for planting other than seeds.
QNIGs can continue to move from Northern Ireland to Great Britain in the same way as before. QNIGs are goods either:
If you are an operator based in Great Britain and receive a consignment of plants or plant material from Northern Ireland which are QNIGs and subject to plant passport requirements, they will arrive at your premises with an EU plant passport as before.
As these are QNIGs you do not need to routinely replace this EU plant passport with a UK plant passport, and the goods may be moved on under their EU plant passport unless you either:
If any of the above points apply, a UK plant passport could be issued without a full examination of the plants taking place before onward movement.
If you replace a plant passport on a QNIG you must put the code ‘GB(NI)’ in Part E of that replacement UK plant passport, to help maintain their identity as QNIGs.
This is to aid monitoring of compliance with plant passporting requirements, including the specific provisions for QNIGs.
This will help make sure that it is easily visible whether a good has originated outside of Great Britain’s phytosanitary zone, yet may not have undergone full third country checks, which will be important for tracing purposes in the event of a pest or disease is found.
If the phytosanitary status of your consignment changes, then a full examination will need to be carried out on the plants. For example, if:
Once confirmed they are fully aligned with Great Britain’s plant health standards, a standard UK plant passport with Part E left blank could be issued.
Read guidance on when plants have been grown under Part D (country of origin).
If you were authorised to issue EU plant passports, you do not need a new authorisation to issue UK plant passports.
You must renew your authorisations every year using eDomero for APHA. Your business will be audited to check you are compliant. Read guidance on how to apply for authorisation.
Contact Forestry Commission to review your authorisation if you issue plant passports for wood, wood products or isolated bark.
If you’re authorised to issue UK plant passports, your supplier in an EU member state can attach plant passports for you. They can do this until 30 June 2023.
Your supplier must use the passports you give them.
Your UK plant passport attached in an EU member state has draft status. It has no legal status in Great Britain until the plants have passed your examination.
Your passports must be:
Your plants must:
If the plants pass your examination you can issue the passport. You do not need to mark the passport to show it has been issued.
If the plants fail your examination, you must remove the plant passport. You will have to correct any issues you have identified or destroy the plants.
If you find a quarantine pest, you must hold the plants and immediately notify a plant health inspector.
If you correct the issues, you must attach a new UK plant passport.
You must keep a record of all plant examinations you carry out.
As the operator responsible for issuing plant passports, you are responsible for complying with the rules.
EU plant passports cannot be attached in England, Scotland or Wales (Great Britain). They can continue to be attached in Northern Ireland.
You will need a phytosanitary certificate when moving regulated plants and plant material that need a plant passport to Northern Ireland.
Imports from the EU to Northern Ireland can continue to use an EU plant passport.
Imports from the EU to Great Britain need a phytosanitary certificate.
The process for replacing a phytosanitary certificate with a UK plant passport will remain the same.
Plant passports should be issued at the first place of destination, that is the first premises the commodities reach for drop off, such as a depot or retail outlet.
If you import goods to the UK under a phytosanitary certificate, you only need to issue a UK plant passport for your goods if:
EU plant passports do not need to be invalidated when they enter Great Britain. As the format is different to the UK plant passport they can easily be differentiated. The EU plant passport is automatically invalid.
Great Britain no longer uses the EU designation of protected zones (PZs), and instead uses the internationally recognised term of pest-free area (PFA).
Protected zone pests will either become GB quarantine pests (which are absent throughout Great Britain), or PFA pests (which are absent in only part of Great Britain).
Commodities which are hosts of GB quarantine pests need standard UK plant passports for movement within Great Britain.
Commodities which are hosts of PFA pests will require PFA UK plant passports for their movement within Great Britain.
A PFA plant passport should have the words ‘UK plant passport – PFA’ at the top of the label, and the EPPO code of the relevant PFA pest.
Check which commodities need PFA plant passports to find the code you need to include.
Contact APHA if you need more information on PFAs.
Some seeds that need a plant passport also need certification. The plant passport can be merged with the certification label.
The label must have the words ‘UK Plant Passport’ with the remaining certification information below that.
To find out if you trade in seeds that need certification check the list of the agricultural and vegetable seeds.
If you split a consignment or send the consignment to somewhere else where a passport is needed, you’ll need to issue new UK plant passports for the new consignments. If a UK plant passport is already attached to the new consignments, you do not have to issue new UK plant passports.
For example, if you had a trolley of plants covered by a single UK plant passport and then split that into different trays of plants to send to different operators, new UK plant passports will need to be attached to each of the trays. You do not need a new passport if:
If any of these points are not followed then a meticulous examination must take place for a new UK plant passport to be issued.
The UK plant passport must be attached to the smallest package in which you transport your plants or plant material.
If you move the same commodity on pallets, boxes, trays, or in bags, the plant passport must be attached to each of those individual units.
Multiple plant species can be listed on a single plant passport as long as traceability is provided for all regulated plants or plant material listed on the plant passport.
If there’s a mix of plants on a trolley and it’s going directly to a retail outlet (for example, a garden centre), you can just attach the passport to the trolley. The passport must be attached to the trolley itself. It cannot be a delivery note with the driver.
Plants or plant material on the trolley can have a passport attached to that trolley at any stage of the supply chain if they are:
You can issue a plant passport for an individual plant or for a single unit, such as a box, tray, bag or bundle. The passport can be:
For plant passports being sold to customers by a distance contract (for example, online sales), you can attach the plant passport:
You must complete a supplier document for certain plants.
This requirement is separate to a plant passport. Plant passports and supplier documents can not be substituted for each other.
If you did not need a supplier document before plant passport requirements changed on 14 December 2019, you do not need one now. You may still need a plant passport.
Check the following lists to find out if your consignment needs to travel with a supplier document:
Your consignment must also travel with a supplier document if you’re moving ornamental plant propagating material, including seeds.
You must make a supplier document for certain plants.
Your supplier document for fruit and vegetable plants must include:
Your supplier document for ornamental plants must include:
Your records must allow APHA to investigate any pest or disease outbreaks.
If a supplier sends you a plant passport in the form of a label, you may store this physically or digitally. You do not have to keep supplier documents.
If you have issued a plant passport you must record (and keep for 3 years):
If you are a professional operator that has received a plant passport you must:
If you are a professional operator that has supplied a plant passport you must record who you supplied that plant passport to.
A professional operator is any person involved professionally in, and legally responsible for, one or more of the following activities concerning plants or wood:
You must contact APHA if you suspect you’ve found quarantine or non-indigenous pests or diseases.
Updated the guidance section on ‘Christmas trees’ under the heading ‘Register as a professional operator and get authorised to issue UK plant passports’.
Updated guidance under ‘UK plant passports in the EU’. Plant passports issued by an authorised UK operator can be attached by an EU supplier until 30 June 2023.
Updated the inspection fees section with information about associated activities.
Update to ‘UK plant passports in the EU’ section. UK plant passports can be attached in an EU member state until 30 June 2022, provided the format and attachment is correct.
This guide has been extensively updated throughout to reflect new plant passporting legislation in GB. Previously this guidance was in line with EU legislation.
Updated the plant and products which must have passports for all movements document.
Updated plant passporting protected zones document.
Removed “the letters ‘EW’ (this is the code for APHA) should go before your unique APHA registration number ” from Part B of Make a Plant Passport
Updated the plant and products which must have passports for all movements document
Updated the plant and products which must have passports for all movements document
Updated plant passporting protected zones document
Updated the plant and products which must have passports for all movements document
Changes to rules for movement within the EU
Updated plant passporting protected zones document
Updated fees section due to 2019 regulations.
Protected zones, and plants which must have passports in protected zones document updated
Quarantine pests and disease index updated
Updated document – Plant and products which must have passports for all movements
Quarantine pest and disease index updated
Link to EU protected zones document updated
Updated the fees information due to changes from 6 April 2018.
Updated the ‘quarantine pest and disease index’ document
Updated the ‘quarantine pest and disease index’ document
Updated the ‘quarantine pest and disease index’ document
Moved inspectors text from ‘renew authorisation’ section to ‘apply to be authorised’ section. Added paragraph about ‘single visit status’.
Updated document – Plant and products which must have passports for all movements
Updated ‘Making a plant passport’ section to reference new Fruit Propagation Certification Scheme (FPCS) instead of the Plant Health Propagation Scheme (PHPS), which it largely replaces.
First published.
Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.
To help us improve GOV.UK, we’d like to know more about your visit today. We’ll send you a link to a feedback form. It will take only 2 minutes to fill in. Don’t worry we won’t send you spam or share your email address with anyone.

source
On our own platform we offer you an extensive range of products, including driving licenses and permits. With us you can conveniently buy a driver’s license or passport almost at any time – and all securely over the Internet!

http://alleforschungschemikalien.de/

Leave a Reply